The Bloomberg ad (and Trump’s)

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Tom Dougherty, CEO – Stealing Share

15 January 2020

Will a Bloomberg Super Bowl ad or even Trump’s make a difference?

It’s never too early to start talking about Super Bowl ads, right? This year, in addition to the beer, chips and avocado ads, Super Bowl viewers will be treated to not one but two large-scale political ads. The Michael Bloomberg ad will run 60 seconds to the cost of approximately $10 million.

Donald Trump will do the same.

Trump’s ad will likely play up on his accomplishments while the Bloomberg ad, featuring a candidate hell-bent on just pissing Trump off, will likely be very critical of the president. Both will likely be great theater for those who support Trump and those who don’t. Each side will claim its ad the winner.

And at the end of the day, it won’t matter.

After the Super Bowl, there will be the obligatory, “Top 10 Super Bowl Ads of 2020” articles which may or may not include the Bloomberg ad or the one from the Trump campaign. (And, hell, I may even wrote one.) But even still it won’t matter.

The Bloomberg ad (and Trump’s) will go the way as most Super Bowl spots

Why? Let’s fast forward a week after the Super Bowl. These two ads along with 90% of the others will be forgotten, despite their enormous expense. A few ads might be remembered, but it will be the entertainment value of the spots coming to mind. Not whether they are persuasive or even the sponsor being recalled.

“With the Bloomberg ad and Trump’s to cost $10 million, neither campaign will feel much of a dent in their coffers. It’s sad because no matter what side of the political fence you sit on, a presidential candidate should have better judgment than to literally waste $10 million.”

More importantly, the Bloomberg ad and Trump’s will fail in their purposes. They won’t persuade. When the Bloomberg ad comes on, Trump supporters will either go get another beer or dig in their heels and yell at the TV. Conversely, when Trump’s ad comes on, people who don’t support Trump will do the same. 

Often advertising in the Super Bowl is a way for a company to say, “We’ve made it.” It’s like a celebrity walking the red carpet. At best, Super Bowl ads are a reminder of some product or service or even to announce a new one. They’re strictly for awareness and most of the brands who advertise during the Super Bowl don’t need increased awareness. They need increased market share.

The US is very familiar with Trump and Bloomberg isn’t going to announce there is a new “Bloomberg.”

But this isn’t about any of that. It’s really about two New Yorkers running out into the street to see who has the bigger dick.

With the Bloomberg ad and Trump’s to cost $10 million, neither campaign will feel much of a dent in their coffers. It’s sad because no matter what side of the political fence you sit on, a presidential candidate should have better judgment than to literally waste $10 million.

See more posts in the following related categories: Super Bowl Ads

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