Retailing brands

Picture of Tom Dougherty

Tom Dougherty, CEO – Stealing Share

12 November 2019

Why don’t retailing brands get it?

Do retailing brands understand why Amazon’s eating their lunches? Because sometimes I wonder, with all the ways they are hoping to attract customers as the holiday shopping season officially launches.

retailing brands

Come on, shoppers. Let’s make some Rice Krispies Treats!

Consider this. Macy’s, whose revenue keeps dropping, introduces “Home for the Holidays” at 36 locations. What’s that? Well, it’s a place where you can decorate Rice Krispies Treats, make ornaments and create Christmas cards.

Wow. Better bolt down the doors! Because the crowds are coming!

Macy’s isn’t the only one among today’s retailing brands that simply don’t get it. Kohl’s, as usual, focuses on its Kohl’s Cash program in which you get $15 for each $50 spent. Target is pushing Black Friday as early as possible with a Black Friday Preview Sale last week.

Did anyone notice?

“Macy’s ‘Home for the Holidays’ actually asks those consumers to interact more with store employees. Who wants that? The public has already voted. They don’t want that. Why do retailing brands continue to force it?”

Retailing brands believe the wrong things

Let’s consider Macy’s “Home for the Holidays” events. One of the reasons why Amazon dominates is because people don’t want to interact with the stores. We live in an iPhone-driven world in which we interact by proxy. Few actually want to talk to someone.

Macy’s “Home for the Holidays” actually asks those consumers to interact more with store employees. Who wants that? The public has already voted. They don’t want that. Why do retailing brands continue to force it?

I continually rant on this because, as a commentator on RetailWire, I see retailers continually insist the way out of their mess is to make the store experience better. That, if only it was more enjoyable for people to shop at the store, that’ll completely turn the trend around.

Keep dreaming.

“Home for the Holidays” is just one example. Last week, I wrote that JC Penney adding yoga classes at its locations was simply a retail brand digging its head in the sand.

What will get retailing brands out of their ruts is making their brands so persuasive and emotional that consumers want to interact with them.

Why is that so hard?

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