Kroger rebranding

Tom Dougherty, CEO – Stealing Share

7 November 2019

Kroger rebranding trots out the tired clichés

The new Kroger rebranding is anything but. The grocery chain is unveiling what it calls a new brand by adjusting its logo and trotting out the cutting-edge theme of “Fresh for Everyone.”

Wow. That’s out there, man.

Sarcasm aside, as the grocery wars heat up, attempts by brands to attract new customers are becoming even more ineffective than ever before. How much money was dished out for this Kroger rebranding?

“Secondly, the Kroger rebranding of ‘Fresh for Everyone’ is simply a cliché in the field of grocery marketing. Years ago, Albertsons featured singing fruits, vegetables and, well, potatoes on being fresh. The theme of fresh has been going on for years.”

The logo is simply an update, retaining the elongated K and G of previous iterations with blue remaining its signature color. But how is this any different than any of its competitors?

Let’s break it down. Why keep blue? Kroger says blue “represents the Kroger brand heritage of food savvy and signals safety and trust to customers.”

Kroger rebrandingWhat?

Two of its main competitors, Albertsons and Walmart, carry blue as their signature colors. How is the Kroger rebranding differentiating at all?

Kroger rebranding should do more

Even worse is the “Fresh for Everyone” theme. I’ve got two issues. Who currently goes to their favorite grocery store expecting rotten food? Meaning, people don’t switch preferred brands for something they already think they have. If you believed your favorite grocer didn’t have fresh food, it wouldn’t be your preferred choice in the first place.

Secondly, the Kroger rebranding of “Fresh for Everyone” is simply a cliché in the field of grocery marketing. Years ago, Albertsons featured singing fruits, vegetables and, well, potatoes on being fresh. The theme of fresh has been going on for years.

The signing potato of Albertsons singing, “We’re Fresh.”

The grocery wars are real. In the past few months, Trader Joe’s and Sprouts have opened stores in my area, now competing with Walmart, Food Lion and Kroger-owned Harris Teeter. They are all within a mile radius of each other.

How are grocers creating preference? By fighting on the same playing field. Certainly, Walmart owns low prices. But the rest? Oh, they all talk about pickup and delivery (as the Kroger rebranding also did in its commercial), friendly employees and, yes, fresh food.

Kroger spent millions with its new branding, but it’s a waste of time and money that probably made the executives feel good because it’s safe.

The fear of change prevents most brands from truly stealing market share. The Kroger rebranding is example A of that.

See more posts in the following related categories: Grocery

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Share This