Best Buy logo

Tom Dougherty, CEO – Stealing Share

10 May 2018

Best Buy logo rebrands in the weakest way possible

Here’s the goddamn truth when it comes to most companies rebranding. They get half pregnant. They don’t go all in with their rebranding. The change is minimal, and then they wonder how come preference hasn’t improved. Case in point: The new Best Buy logo.

Best Buy logoI’m not speaking about just the Best Buy logo itself. Logos and other communications are simply representations of the brand itself. The brand is who the customer is when they use the brand. Apple customers “think different.” Nike customers “just do it.”

Best Buy simply updates its logo, still using the outline of a stupid sales tag, and claims the new position is about its employees. Yes, the employees.

From Best Buy CEO Whit Alexander. “Telling the story of our people – and how we make a meaningful impact on customers’ lives – is at the heart of this work. Our people are our insurmountable advantage.”

“Thirdly, where’s the customer in this? Just someone who needs help? We can get that from any Google search or YouTube video. Our people are our insurmountable advantage? You’ve got to be kidding me.”

Oh. My. God. This represents the equivalent of a bank saying, “Bank here. We have friendly people. Because people who work at other banks are nasty.” Saying that while ignoring the changing market forces is suicide.

Best Buy logo is only one of the failures

Oh, were do I start? First, for Best Buy’s employees to be reason to choose you’d have to believe other electronics outlets have ill-informed and incapable employees. Then, even if that’s the case, you have to believe that’s the greatest emotional reason to choose an electronics retailer.

Thirdly, where’s the customer in this? Just someone who needs help? We can get that from any Google search or YouTube video. Our people are our insurmountable advantage? You’ve got to be kidding me.

Best Buy says same-store sales have risen 9%. But that’s simply a product of so many other electronic outlets going out of business. When Circuit City, RadioShack and HH Gregg go out of business, sure your sales go up.

But is this the way to prepare for long-term growth in an ever-changing retail market? By changing only a little? By keeping the sales tag in your logo that represents brick and mortar retail? This is the response to survival?

The Best Buy logo represents that half pregnancy. It’s an update that does nothing. Even its brand fulfillment of its employees promise falls flat. Remember the Geek Squad? Now, Best Buy offers a Total Tech Support solution for $200 a year.

How is that better? Who’s gonna buy that?

Best Buy, come talk to us after this rebranding effort fails.

See more posts in the following related categories: retail branding

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