Remembrance Day equals Veterans Day

Remembrance Day
Veterans Day is more aptly named Remembrance Day

Today is Remembrance Day in the Commonwealth of Nations (which includes Canada).

It is a solemn pause in the work week (I hesitate to call it a holiday) when the citizens of Europe, India, Australia, New Zealand and Ireland remember the fallen generation of the Great War (WW1).

Remember: On the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month— All quiet on the Western Front.

Remembrance Day
Soldiers preparing for no-mans-land

The horror of that War, still unequalled in the lunacy of human history, was to be remembered for all time with the promise to do such things never again.

Forgive me if I rail about this misnaming every year on Armistice day.

The special day of remembrance and reflection was truly known as Armistice Day in the US until, as an example of the wisdom of Congress, the name was changed to Veterans Day in 1954.

Remembrance Day hurts

The young men of 19 tender years of age that were slaughtered in that war were to be remembered forever. The red poppy became a symbol of the dead in Flanders Fields. Here are the first two verses of the poem that made the red poppy synonymous with the Great War.

“In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Remembrance Day
Human remains are still being found 150 years later

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.”

 

Below is a video featuring LAST POST. A bugle call tied to Remembrance Day.

This past summer my wife and I visited memorials, cemeteries and battlefields in France and Belgium.

At the battle of the Somme, fought between 1 July and 18 November 1916, more than one million men were wounded or killed, making it one of the bloodiest battles in human history. It is that sacrifice that gave birth to Remembrance Day.

Remembrance Day
Vimy Ridge. The ground still looks like ocean swells from the pounding of shells 150 years ago.

What was lost.

As Americans, we were spared most of the carnage of that war. We entered the last year of the War and, while are casualties were terrible, they paled compared to the massacre of Europe, the British and French Empires.

Remembrance Day
Remembrance Day in London last year.

Perhaps that is why the date is still honored in Canada with its original meaning. Newfoundland, part of the Commonwealth of Nations but not yet (in 1916) part of Canada, had 100% casualties at the Somme.

Every young man from that small province was lost. An entire generation was lost and honored on Remembrance Day.

Never again.

Visit Ypres, the Somme, or Vimy Ridge and those young men who died so young 150 years ago live again. The land is still twisted and scarred.

The dead still lie inches beneath the soil and in perfectly manicured graveyards. Over 1,000 of them. I visited too many to count.

Do we lose something important in our history lesson by calling Remembrance Day (Armistice Day)? Is it Veterans Day? I think we do. We lose the main idea of the day— to reflect on the great losses and promise never again. It is the promise part we miss.

The Dish Tribune war only affects Dish

If you are a Dish subscriber, you are well aware of the Dish Tribune Media dispute, with Tribune owning 42 local stations and WGN America. All Tribune Media stations went dark on Dish on June 12th.

This is bad for both brands, but terrible for Dish.

Dish Tribune
The Dish Tribune dispute puts the onus on Dish, not Tribune.

At issue is the price Dish is willing to pay Tribune to air its stations. Depending on which side you are on in the Dish Tribune war, Dish claims that Tribune wants more than its worth and Tribune claims that Dish is not negotiating in good faith because Dish is not willing to pay the same that other cable and satellite providers are paying.

The beliefs in the Dish Tribune dispute.

If you have read anything at all on our site, you know that what is actually true takes a back seat to what is believed. From a consumer’s perspective, subscribers of Dish believe they are the ones being punished and it’s Dish, not Tribune Media, that doing the harm. Needless to say, Dish customers are complaining to whoever is listening. If you believe Tribune, nearly 300,000 subscribers left the satellite provider in the second quarter alone.

From a business perspective, I understand that Dish wants to get Tribune as cheaply as possible. (It also doesn’t help Dish that it’s behind DirecTV and some cable providers in subscribers, meaning it doesn’t have the cash others do.) I also understand that Tribune wants to get paid at the same rate it does from the rest of the TV providers.

As a customer, therefore, I get angry at the company I am paying each month to bring me the content it promised to deliver. I think most consumers believe they are paying too much for the television programming already, which is one of the reasons so many people are cutting the cord.

What does Dish accomplish by telling its customers that the Dish Tribune dispute is the fault of the content provider? Does it expect its subscribers to stand up in support?

Dish has a serious brand problem. Its promise to deliver content has failed. The belief is that Dish is wrong and that Tribune is being reasonable.

Since a lot of Tribune Media stations air NFL football, subscribers will be forced to watch the games elsewhere when the season beings in a few weeks. At that point, it will be too late for Dish.

The IKEA experience is rooted in a belief

I am not much into indulging in the retail experience. I could care less about walking up and down aisles of loot, envisioning stuff I might want to have at home. Nope. I am the kind of guy that knows what I want to buy and strikes quickly on that impulse. No mess, no fuss. It’s an in and out shopping exploit.

Or I just go online.

Then there is IKEA. Sure, the company has had its share of bad press of late. (All of which could have been avoided by folks using the included strap and bolting to fix their dressers to the wall.) IKEA is an experience for me. Judging by my last venture there, it’s that way for most everyone who visits.

IKEA
IKEA has built its experience on its brand.

In the spirit of transparency, I should tell you that I worked on the IKEA brand many years ago. But I’m pleased to see that it has maintained a shopping experience so pleasant that it has become a destination for many.

IKEA’s parking lot is littered with moving vans and family cars with license plates from a multitude of states. Those same families file into the store cafe to fill up on a lunch or dinner – typically, beef or chicken meatballs – and follow that up with an hour or so jaunt through the store.

I have never been let down by IKEA, and neither have my family members. Just last week, I went with my son and his family. They came along looking for something fun to do, without any intention of buying. When we left, they spent just shy of $400 on goods for their home – and probably would have bought more if we had more room in the car.

IKEA functions according to an unwavering precept

At Stealing Share, we believe human behavior is driven by what we believe to be true about the world and ourselves. IKEA’s brand is rooted in the idea that a stylish home can be had by everyday people. So its stores showcase how that can be done.

It focuses on the little things: The maze-like design of the two-story structure, the kids’ playroom allowing parents to fully dive into the shopping experience and the offering of food and drink all contribute to its brand promise. It is a concierge service for those who normally can’t afford it. The belief is: “I believe I should be treated with respect for my lifestyle.”

While I only visit the store every year or so, when I go I always am expecting to buy something and to have a fun time doing it. I don’t know of any other retailer that holds such a place in my heart. What’s more, I don’t see that behavior of mine changing any time soon.

Brexit succession means nobody wins

The unthinkable happened with Brexit

Brexit is racismBrexit was a bloodless civil war. We have come along way (or have we?). Time was an obscure Archduke could be assassinated in Bosnia and the whole world would be dragged into a global war later called the First World War in history books.

In 1861, the United States of America began a bloody struggle to decide the legality of succession. We called that fight the Civil War and it took four blood soaked years and millions of lives to settle. In the end, the decision was made that no state was sovereign enough to resign its place in the United States.

Shelby Foote famously said that, before the Civil War, people said the United States “Is” and after the Civil War they said The United States “Are”.

Yesterday, the United Kingdom VOTED to leave the European Union. In our Twitter world, the vote was shortened to Brexit. It is an example of how blind nationalism can cloud judgment and how people will emotionally vote for things that in the long term are not in their own best interest. I wonder if Scotland wishes it had another shot at their historic vote to remain in the United Kingdom? Scotexit never became a word.

Brexit means?

Brexit winsI think a great deal of world stability will be shaken by this vote. I can see further troubles stirring in Northern Ireland again. I believe the uncertainty in the world’s monetary systems will shake rattle and roll the financial markets for a while as the global community tries to discount this tsunami of change. Everything we have come to rely on in this global world has been challenged.

But the reason I write this is because NO ONE doubts the RIGHT of the UK to secede (not to be confused in any way with succeed).

In the US, we thought the illegality of succession was decided and written in blood 150 years ago. Americans believe we have a corner on the market when it comes to freedom and liberty. We are wrong.

Freedom of self-determination was just exercised in Europe to an extent we can’t even fathom in the US. Had this RIGHT been self evident, I would be penning this blog in the Confederate States of America because I live in North Carolina—a state that lost 1 out of every 4 casualties at Gettysburg  during the Civil War.

To me, it does not matter if you think the American Civil War was fought over state’s rights or slavery. The impetus for the temporary dissolution of the United States in the late 1800’s was due to a racist issue.

I think the same is true for Brexit.

Racist underpinnings

I don’t believe it was so much an economic issue as it was over a war on immigration. The UK did not want Europe dictating immigration policy. They just don’t want THEM settling in the UK any more.  Think about it, the UK never surrendered their currency to the Euro. The Pound  Sterling remained.

BrexitSo much for economics driving succession.

I find Brexit a sad move. Not for all the obvious reason of a common market and ease of travel. I find it sad that bigotry wins anywhere and under any circumstances.

You can have your DNA tested for just a couple of dollars (or Euros or pounds) these days. It points to your REAL ancestry.

Funny, the differences are very small. We all began in Africa and are very much the same. Only the adopted and insignificant drapery of religious preference and favorite cuisine separates us all one from another.

Thailand buddhist temple tigers

Thailand Buddhist Temple Tigers

buddhist temple tigersThe news about 40 dead tiger cubs at the Thailand Temple makes me cringe. So I ask, what is your personal responsibility in embracing a brand of Buddhist Temple Tigers as your own?

I’m going to make the argument that it is a deadly serious responsibility. One that most of us ignore (the root of the word ignorant).

Why should it surprise any of us that any tourist venues (and the Buddhist Temple resplendent with tigers was just that) that have us interact with animals in what appears to be an unnatural way is a form of exploitation. When we participate in this charade, we endorse it. It becomes our personal brand.

I remember as a kid my folks took my sister and I on a station wagon vacation. These types of vacations were the norm for my family so it wasn’t until my 16th birthday that I first rode in an airplane. My Dad drove us everywhere, but that is a meaty story for another day.

It was the summer of 1964 and our family began a cross country trek from our home in New Jersey to Yellowstone National Park. Mom and Dad were not the adventurous type and I don’t remember doing any REAL hiking in the park. On the contrary, my experience in the park was restricted to boardwalk pedestrian access to hot springs, photo oportunities and point of interest.

Buddhist Temple tigers are like bear jams

The highlight for me, the nine year old, was certainly the bear jams. A bear or a mother bear and her cubs took up a begging position on a main road and everyone filed out of the car to feed the begging animals candy, cookies or chips. When the ranger finally arrived and forced everyone to leave (because we were all in some danger, being inches away from a wild animal) the bear jam dispersed and everyone piled back in their cars seeking the next jam a mile or so up the road.

No one mentioned the danger TO the poor bear. No one said it was unnatural and unhealthy for a bear to become habituated to people, reliant on hand-outs for food and, worse still, nourished on a diet of human junk food.

Ten years later and the bears were gone. The National Park Service began to really crack down on tourists who stopped and fed bears. It closed the dumps in the park where bears congregated for easy food and installed bear-proof trash cans everywhere in the park.

Today, there may be an occasional bear jam but it is when a brownie or grizzly is spotted hundreds of yards away moving in its natural habitat. When you visit Yellowstone today, your brand is that of an unspoiled naturalist. Good for everyone. Including the bears.

But, as I scan Facebook for the comings and goings of friends and friends of friends, I can’t tell you how many, otherwise smart people, go to swim with the dolphins and think the animals are perfectly happy to haul humans around on their dorsal fins. My God. Watch The Cove and see just how these animals are captured and the amount of tranquilizers they must be fed to keep them docile and only a little crazy.

Outrage over the movie Black Fish has pressured Sea World to change its focus on Shamu (at least a little bit of change) and Ringling Brothers has retired its elephants.

How ignorant can we be?

Buddhist Temple TigersBut we are surprised that the Buddhist Temple tigers in Thailand, which has become de rigueur for Bangkok tourists who pay $100 to have their picture made with adult Tigers, is natural? What is it about these Buddhist monks that makes these solitary uber-predators docile? That’s easy. It’s called mistreatment. Tigers don’t care about your philosophy, vegetarian diet or religion. They don’t even care if you practice non-violence. Tigers are tigers.

They need our protection not domestication. Its easy to recognize that something terrible is actually going on.

So when you visit a dolphin enclosure, the Buddhist Temple Tigers, a circus (with trained lions and tigers) or a Sea World-type park, your brand is not innocent tourist. Your brand is exploitative human. Selfish and ignorant.