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Google Play is an exercise in iTunes redundancy

Yesterday, I noticed a new link on Google called “Play.”

I was curious about it and clicked on it. Let it be known, I hold a deep respect for Google. Short of Apple, I find Google on the cusp of innovation. Its homepage alone is a testament to branding simplicity. Clutter-less and direct, the page prompts users to engage in one simple activity, searching. Needless to say, from a branding perspective, I am always intrigued by new additions to its repertoire.

Play is an exciting feature for Google. Users can find an array of entertainment or, in Google speak, “Play” options. Much like the iTunes music store, you can search and download apps (albeit, made for the Android system), find books and magazines, music, games, and television shows and movies. It has everything in one place, offering convenience for both Google and Android users.

But here is the chink in Play’s armor.

How can Play ever be more opportune than the iTunes Music Store? In short, it can’t.

Reflecting further, will Play entice Apple users to the Google entertainment system? This answer seems clear. Play simply offers convenience for current users, not serving as a reason for others to switch.

It is obvious that Play will mostly be used by current Google and Android users. It does not offer any services different than what’s found on iTunes, so the incentive for Apple users to change to the Google Play system simply isn’t there. Sadly for Google, this means Play’s offering is an exercise in redundancy, not innovation.

In order to steal market share, Google must think differently than Apple, the very company that owns the motto: “Think Different.” If Play is any indication, Google isn’t thinking differently. Instead, it is simply offering a redesigned iTunes concept.




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