• About Tom Dougherty

    Tom Dougherty CEO, Stealing Share

    Tom Dougherty is the President and CEO of Stealing Share, Inc., and has helped national and global brands such as Lexus, IKEA and Tide steal market share over his 25-year career.

    An often-quoted source on business and brands, he has been featured recently by the New York Times and CNN, discussing topics ranging from television to Apple to airlines.

    Tom also regularly speaks at conferences as a keynote and break-out speaker. To find out more on inviting him to your speaking engagement and view a video of him speaking, click here.

    You can also reach him via email attomd@stealingshare.com.

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A Brookstone rebrand is desperately needed

I did something that I really detest the other day — I went to the mall.

My wife and I were away for a few days and had an afternoon to spare. Being a bit of a pushover when it comes to my wife, I gave in. Most times, this means I hang around clothing stores with her in the hopes that I can locate a comfy chair to park myself in and peruse the apps on my phone. Sometimes I get lucky, like at a DSW, and there’s a chair in front of TV with ESPN airing. If I am not a stereotypical guy, I don’t know who is.

Walking around with my wife, I was reminded of a time — long, long ago — where there were stores that met the liking of the tech geek in me. Now, not so much.

Brookstone rebrand
A Brookstone rebrand is needed for it to regain relevancy.

FYI, a music and DVD store, sells a modicum of titles an exorbitant rate. Best Buy Mobile has phone cases and a tablet or two, and Brookstone is filled second rate technology.

Brookstone was once a store I coveted to visit. Before Apple, Microsoft and Amazon were making the coolest gadgets, the outlet shop’s goods would give me butterflies. I’d soak up everything on every single shelf and pick up and tinker with all of it.

Now, the goods at Brookstone are like the cheap goods on display just prior to the register at TJ MAXX.

A Brookstone rebrand is a must.

There is enough lingering positive connotation here that a Brookstone rebrand would be most welcome. In fact, it’s needed or the brand will go away. Just recently, the company announced it will introduce its products in Macy’s (although Macy’s has its own problems.) I’m not sure if that will fix the problem. Macy’s is also flirting with irrelevancy and I don’t see the synergy between the two brands.

In fact, it’s probably a weakening of the Macy’s brand. What does its brand stand for now? Talk about the need for a rebrand.

What better time for Brookstone to examine its brand more closely, weed out the inferior technology and bring back the state-of-the-art merchandise that put it’s name on the map? It’s time for Brookstone to regain its importance to tech nerds like me.

Right now is the time for Brookstone to reimagine itself as a visionary company, not just a trendy one where teens can hang for an hour and sit in a massage chair.

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