• About Tom Dougherty

    Tom Dougherty CEO, Stealing Share

    Tom Dougherty is the President and CEO of Stealing Share, Inc., and has helped national and global brands such as Lexus, IKEA and Tide steal market share over his 25-year career.

    An often-quoted source on business and brands, he has been featured recently by the New York Times and CNN, discussing topics ranging from television to Apple to airlines.

    Tom also regularly speaks at conferences as a keynote and break-out speaker. To find out more on inviting him to your speaking engagement and view a video of him speaking, click here.

    You can also reach him via email attomd@stealingshare.com.

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Google products are interesting but not different

Let me be the first to admit that Google’s new line of technology looks pretty sweet. My interest is piqued when new devices arrive, regardless if I trust the company’s motivations or generally suffer from a fickle relationship with the outfit.

The new products from Google just mimic everyone else.

In case you missed it, Google’s “Made by Google” site is alive and well. Yesterday, the business introduced its response to the iPhone with Pixel, a virtual reality headset called the Daydream View, an updated version of its Chromecast streaming device, and a voice activated speaker called Google Home (think Amazon’s Echo). All of the aforementioned products are solely produced by the company, a change from past practices.

Google really had me with the debut of its new gadgets — possibly because they looked a lot like Apple products. Yet, unfortunately, I speedily lost when it chose to poke fun at Apple, the very company it is mimicking. That doesn’t get anyone to switch and it’s wasted energy.

The only way to steal market share is to be truly different and better than the competition, especially the market leader. A jibe is okay, but it looks empty and petty when your products are no different.

Are the products from Google any different than anyone else?

Here’s exactly what I mean. Google said, “3.5mm headphone jack satisfyingly not new,” which was followed by a cough in jest. That jest was a slight at Apple for not including a headphone jack on the iPhone 7.

What Google missed by that jab was that Apple was thinking differently, which falls in line with its brand. Google has its own powerful brand, but it plays into Apple’s hands when its products do not think different. That means Apple is positioned against them.

While you must position yourself against the market leader to steal share, it’s difficult to do when your own products mimic the market leaders, no matter the industry.

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