• About Tom Dougherty

    Tom Dougherty CEO, Stealing Share

    Tom Dougherty is the President and CEO of Stealing Share, Inc., and has helped national and global brands such as Lexus, IKEA and Tide steal market share over his 25-year career.

    An often-quoted source on business and brands, he has been featured recently by the New York Times and CNN, discussing topics ranging from television to Apple to airlines.

    Tom also regularly speaks at conferences as a keynote and break-out speaker. To find out more on inviting him to your speaking engagement and view a video of him speaking, click here.

    You can also reach him via email attomd@stealingshare.com.

    Follow me on Twitter

Goodbye, SkyMall. You were loved.

Oh, SkyMall, how will I miss you? I’ve passed many hours with you on an airplane, especially during those times when the airline lets us sit on the tarmac for hours. (How kind of them.)

How I’ve longed for the Garden Yeti and the various electronic gizmos that could populate my home.

You know, I almost bought this once.
You know, I almost bought this once.

Your declaration of bankruptcy means I’m going to have to live without you. I’ll have to quit you.

The news about SkyMall’s bankruptcy doesn’t come as that much of a surprise. The only surprise was that it lasted as long as it did.

As much as I coveted many of the items in it, I never bought one single thing from it. The magazine was purely entertainment for me as I flipped through the pages to see what new, crazy thing SkyMall has come up with.

The entertainment allure started waning once we could play/read/watch on our phones and tablets on the plane. There especially became no reason to look at it when we no longer had to shut down our electronic devices. SkyMall just sat there.

Of course, SkyMall couldn’t make any money by just being about entertainment. It had to prompt people to actually buy something from its collection. On that note, it always had a problem. The products in the magazine are basically impulse buys, and it is hard to buy when you’re in an airplane.

SkyMall knew this, which is why it recently tried to tell readers that they could take the magazine with them and the airline would replace it. But it probably had a better chance of prompting sales by being on QVC or something than having passengers actually take it home and buy something. Even that became harder with the influx of the Internet.

Despite all that, I lament the loss of SkyMall. I have fond memories of chuckling over the products with colleagues who were traveling with me.

Goodbye, SkyMall. You may not have been a financial success but you were truly loved by this frequent traveler.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *