• About Tom Dougherty

    Tom Dougherty CEO, Stealing Share

    Tom Dougherty is the President and CEO of Stealing Share, Inc., and has helped national and global brands such as Lexus, IKEA and Tide steal market share over his 25-year career.

    An often-quoted source on business and brands, he has been featured recently by the New York Times and CNN, discussing topics ranging from television to Apple to airlines.

    Tom also regularly speaks at conferences as a keynote and break-out speaker. To find out more on inviting him to your speaking engagement and view a video of him speaking, click here.

    You can also reach him via email attomd@stealingshare.com.

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Here comes the winter ice storm, so get your milk & bread

Our office in North Carolina is bracing for a pretty bad winter ice storm by North Carolina standards. The latest forecast is calling for almost a foot of snow with some ice on top of that by the time it’s all done.

For an area that it is not really accustomed to that kind winter weather, it actually becomes quite paralyzing when there are not enough plows to clear the roads.

People race to the store to stock up, as is the case in most places when there is the threat of weather that may force people inside for a long time. But a funny thing happens in those cases – folks stock up on milk and bread.

thSure, they may buy other things (bring on the wine!) but the bread aisle and milk cooler are always bare.

What are people planning on making? Milk sandwiches? Soggy bread?

One thing is certain – this is a predictable behavior that is repeated over and over.

And this is why it is interesting to me. Marketing, branding and persuasion are all about changing human behavior. When we talk about a brand or marketing a product, we are trying to change a consumer’s behavior from a preference of one thing to another. What is lost is that, in reality, we really do not want the customer to act in a new way. Rather, we simply want them to make a different choice within their normal actions.

What the milk and bread phenomena demonstrates is that consumer behavior is predictable.

But observing a predictable behavior is only part of it. Through research, we can understand why the behavior occurs. As marketers, we should not point out the folly in the behavior. Instead, we should understand the underlying reasons for the behavior – emotionally and rationally. And we should adapt our messaging, operations, and product mix to be a reflection of that understanding.

If we knew all of the underlying reasons people go out and clear the shelves of bread and milk before a winter ice storm or snowstorm, we could position almost anything to reflect those reasons.

As it stands now, however, grocery stores will just have to continue running out of bread and milk.

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