• About Tom Dougherty

    Tom Dougherty CEO, Stealing Share

    Tom Dougherty is the President and CEO of Stealing Share, Inc., and has helped national and global brands such as Lexus, IKEA and Tide steal market share over his 25-year career.

    An often-quoted source on business and brands, he has been featured recently by the New York Times and CNN, discussing topics ranging from television to Apple to airlines.

    Tom also regularly speaks at conferences as a keynote and break-out speaker. To find out more on inviting him to your speaking engagement and view a video of him speaking, click here.

    You can also reach him via email attomd@stealingshare.com.

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With the Olympics, NBC earned gold. Without it, struggling for bronze.

I was hooked on this summer’s Olympics. Despite my body’s need for sleep, I was up until midnight most nights, soaking in as many events as possible.

There is something exceptional at the core of the Olympics. After all, it’s not every day we are able to witness history.

I wasn’t alone. In fact, the London Olympics were the most-watched television event in US history. According to Nielsen’s data, 219.4 million people viewed a a portion of this summer’s Olympic coverage. NBC was smart to take live coverage to the Internet where the network found 57.1 million unique viewers. It wisely offered free smart phone and tablet applications, which gave eager viewers the chance to tune in and stay current with results.

It’s hard to find fault with NBC’s Olympic coverage from a branding perspective. The problem is, with the summer games over, NBC is finding it hard to compete with FOX’s prime-time content.

“NBC got its first taste of the difference between the Olympics and anything else it can offer in prime time: its audience Monday night dropped about 25 million from the network’s Olympic highs,” reported The New York Times.

These numbers should be a concern because it exposes NBC’s ratings spike as only due to it’s Olympic coverage, not out of brand loyalty.

Here’s why: With the enormity of the network’s viewing audience during the Olympics, there was ample commercial time to highlight upcoming prime-time content — which NBC did. Problem is, that content lacked the punch needed to keep viewers watching after the closing ceremonies.

Days later, The Times reported the gloomy news that “non-Olympic programming on NBC was beaten by Fox by 28 percent.”

Landing the London Olympics was a fancy first place prize for NBC. Yet, to follow that with subpar content like the bizarre “Stars Earn Stripes” was a huge misstep.

In short, NBC quickly returned the massive piece of share it stole from its competitors during the Olympic Games.

Maybe in four years, NBC can celebrate again, but as for now, there is hardly a reason.

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